Utilities

Thursday, March 7, 2019

Duke Energy, the largest investor-owned electric utility in the U.S., wants to charge customers in South Carolina more for using less energy. Duke is asking state regulators for permission to more than triple the flat monthly charge – what customers pay even before they flip a switch, just for being hooked up to the grid – from about $8 to $28.

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News and Analysis
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Thursday, February 7, 2019

The Green New Deal legislation coming before Congress should commit to transitioning the entire U.S. electricity grid to 100 percent renewable energy sources no later than 2035, said Environmental Working Group.

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News Release
Monday, February 4, 2019

Each January, the Energy Department publishes a forecast of the nation’s energy use from different sources for the coming year and beyond. The 2019 Annual Energy Outlook from the department’s Energy Information Administration makes you wonder if the agency has missed the news of the renewable energy revolution.

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Thursday, January 31, 2019

Across America, devastating hurricanes, hellish wildfires, deadly heat waves and other disasters have brought the climate change crisis close to home. In response, more than 100 cities, counties and states – including the two largest, California and New York – have committed to use only renewable or zero-emissions sources for electricity by midcentury.

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News and Analysis
Article
Tuesday, January 15, 2019

Electric utilities often tout natural gas as a clean fuel – an essential weapon in the fight against global warming. Even if they admit the need to replace fossil fuels with solar and wind power eventually, they insist that natural gas is a bridge to the renewable energy future.

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News and Analysis
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Tuesday, January 8, 2019

Last year the Trump administration’s Energy Department announced the launch of a media campaign to counter what an official called “misinformation” about nuclear power. We haven’t noticed an upsurge in pro-nuclear news – because there is none to report.

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News and Analysis
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Tuesday, October 2, 2018

As Hurricane Florence approached North Carolina last month, Duke Energy was busy securing power plants to weather the storm.

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News and Analysis
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Monday, September 10, 2018

The Trump administration’s latest idea to “bring back coal” is to let individual states decide how – or even whether – to cut air pollution from coal-burning power plants. The plan is meant to encourage electric utilities to invest in upgrading their dirty, aging coal plants or build new ones.

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News and Analysis
Article
Monday, July 30, 2018

When homeowners install rooftop solar panels, their electricity bills go down. That’s a threat to the profit margins of big utility companies, and in response they are scheming to undermine the economic benefits of going solar.

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News and Analysis
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Friday, June 8, 2018

In his continuing crusade to prop up dying industries, President Trump wants to make Americans pay for expensive electricity from dirty, dangerous coal and nuclear power plants – even if cheaper, cleaner and safer sources are available.

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News and Analysis
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Monday, April 2, 2018

FirstEnergy, a utility struggling to stay alive in the dying coal and nuclear industries, is once again looking for a bailout from government regulators.

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News and Analysis
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Monday, January 8, 2018

Federal regulators’ rejection today of the White House’s scheme to prop up the coal and nuclear power industries is a big win for electricity customers and renewable energy, said EWG President Ken Cook.

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News Release
Monday, November 6, 2017

FERC data compiled by EWG show why the Trump administration’s friends in the coal and nuclear industries are desperate for a ratepayer bailout: Their plants are losing billions of dollars, and without subsidies to make them competitive with renewable energy and natural gas, utilities are proposing to close 75 coal and nuclear facilities in just three short years.

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Reports & Consumer Guides
Monday, May 8, 2017

Americans who live in highly polluted areas are likely at greater risk of developing cancers, especially breast and prostate cancers, according to a new study from the University of Illinois at Chicago.

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News and Analysis
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