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Chemicals in Food

 

Foods can contain many harmful substances, including pesticides, unhealthy additives or contaminants. EWG is working to reduce the threat of toxic chemicals in food.

Monday, April 28, 2003

Correspondence regarding perchlorate contamination in food growth in the United States

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News Release
Friday, March 1, 2002

Internal Food and Drug Administration (FDA) documents obtained by the Environmental Working Group (EWG) reveal that the agency is failing in its public health obligation to protect pregnant women and the developing fetus from the toxic effects of mercury.

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News Release
Friday, April 13, 2001

Government recommendations for fish consumption could expose more than one in four expectant mothers - 1 million women - to enough mercury to put the health of their fetuses at risk, according to a new computer investigation released today by the Environmental Working Group (EWG) and the U.S. Public Interest Research Group (U.S. PIRG).

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News Release
Sunday, April 1, 2001

On January 12, 2001, government health officials issued new advisories warning women to limit fish consumption during pregnancy to avoid exposing their unborn children to unsafe levels of methylmercury. Methylmercury can cross the placenta and cause learning deficits and developmental delays in children who are exposed even to relatively low levels in the womb. The principal exposure route for the fetus is fish consumption by the mother.

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Reports & Consumer Guides
Wednesday, September 6, 2000

The Organic Trade Association (OTA) today said ABC News intentions to announce a brief token apology on Friday's 20/20 falls far short of what the network must do to make amends to the organic industry.

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Key Issues:
News Release
Wednesday, September 6, 2000

After six months of stone-walling, ABC News yesterday confirmed an Environmental Working Group (EWG) allegation that the network did not conduct pesticide tests for a special "20/20" investigation by correspondent John Stossel that was harshly critical of organic food.

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News Release
Wednesday, September 6, 2000

The food poisoning test that ABC News Correspondent John Stossel used to allege that organic food "could kill you" cannot definitively prove any risk of food poisoning, according to a letter issued by the U.S. Department of Agriculture today.

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News Release
Wednesday, March 1, 2000

Everyone knows that women eat – and often crave – different foods when they’re pregnant. But an Environmental Working Group (EWG) analysis of government data shows that some of the things they eat more of give their babies an extra dose of toxic pollutants at the most delicate stage of life.

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Reports & Consumer Guides
Wednesday, March 1, 2000

Laboratory tests of apples grown in Washington State and purchased in Seattle supermarkets over the past five months found widespread insecticide contamination. Eight percent of apple samples had unsafe levels of a bug killer abruptly banned for use on apples and other foods in August, 1999 by federal authorities because of nervous system risks to children. 

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Reports & Consumer Guides
Thursday, July 1, 1999

n a little-noticed decision earlier this year, the EPA’s top scientific committee on children’s health declared that protections against the toxic weed killer atrazine in food and water should not be considered safe for infants and children. According to the Office of Children’s Health Protection Advisory Committee:

 

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Reports & Consumer Guides
Monday, February 1, 1999

Ten years after the American public demanded that the EPA ban the cancer-causing pesticide Alar, children are no better protected from pesticides in the nation’s food supply. Multiple pesticides known or suspected to cause brain and nervous system damage, cancer, disruption of the endocrine and immune systems, and a host of other toxic effects are ubiquitous in foods children commonly consume at levels that present serious health risks.

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Reports & Consumer Guides
Monday, February 1, 1999

Ten years after a consumer revolt against apples treated with the carcinogen Alar prompted a ban on the chemical, children are no better protected from pesticides in the nation's food supply, according to government data on the pesticides most often found in kids' favorite foods. A new study by EWG shows apples, as well as some other fruits and vegetables, are so contaminated parents should consider substituting items known to be lower in pesticides.

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News Release
Tuesday, June 9, 1998

Lack of basic environmental practices at major U.S.hospitals is resulting in serious pollution problems and contamination of major foods, including baby foods, a new study has found.

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News Release
Thursday, May 21, 1998
Five years after the Clinton Administration promised a bold initiative to reduce pesticide use and make children's health the top priority in federal pesticide regulation, the government has done little or nothing to reduce toxic pesticide use, pesticide residues in food, or pesticide contamination of drinking water, according to a new report by the Environmental Working Group (EWG). Read More
News Release
Thursday, January 29, 1998

Every day, nine out of ten American children between the ages of 6 months and 5 years are exposed to combinations of 13 different neurotoxic insecticides in the foods they eat. While the amounts consumed rarely cause acute illness, these "organophosphate" insecticides (OPs) have the potential to cause long term damage to the brain and the nervous system, which are rapidly growing and extremely vulnerable to injury during fetal development, infancy and early childhood.

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Reports & Consumer Guides
Wednesday, January 28, 1998

Every day, 1 million American children age 5 and under consume unsafe levels of a class of pesticides that can harm the developing brain and nervous system, according to a new analysis of federal data by the Environmental Working Group (EWG).

 
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