Chemicals in Food

 

Foods can contain many harmful substances, including pesticides, unhealthy additives or contaminants. EWG is working to reduce the threat of toxic chemicals in food.

Friday, July 30, 2004

The American Medical Association (AMA), the national professional organization for all physicians in the United States, has adopted a resolution that includes the following recommendation: "Given the limitations of national consumer fish consumption advisories, the Food and Drug Administration should consider the advisability of requiring that fish consumption advisories and results related to mercury testing be posted where fish, including canned tuna, are sold."

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News and Analysis
Article
Tuesday, June 22, 2004

Milk from cows raised in some parts of California may expose infants and children to more of a toxic rocket fuel chemical than is considered safe by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the State of Massachusetts, according to unreleased tests by state agriculture officials and independent laboratory tests commissioned by Environmental Working Group (EWG).

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News Release
Tuesday, June 22, 2004

In a sharp rebuke to the Bush Administration, a federal advisory committee on children's health warns that the EPA's recommended cleanup level for a rocket fuel chemical fails to protect children, fetuses and mothers.

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News Release
Tuesday, June 1, 2004

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) says tests on salmon and trout raised in federal hatcheries in the Northeast found enough PCBs and other toxic chemicals that consumers should severely limit consumption – no more than one meal of the fish every two months.

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News and Analysis
Article
Tuesday, May 25, 2004

A new study by the Pesticide Action Network (PAN) found that a large percentage of people who had their blood and urine tested carried pesticides above levels considered safe by government health and environmental agencies.

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News and Analysis
Article
Friday, May 21, 2004

Grist magazine reports that the Bush Administration, at the behest of agribusiness lobbyists, has quietly taken several actions to weaken national standards for organic food. The Department of Agriculture made the changes without allowing public comment or feedback from the National Organic Standards Board, an advisory panel that is supposed to review changes to the standards.

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Key Issues:
News and Analysis
Article
Tuesday, May 18, 2004

The Oregonian reports consumers are increasingly choosing healthy wild salmon instead of PCB-laden farmed salmon. Studies over the past year by EWG and others have shown that farmed salmon has far higher levels of toxic PCBs than wild salmon. Higher prices for wild salmon are good news for Alaska and other West Coast fishermen who have struggled in recent decades.

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News and Analysis
Article
Monday, March 1, 2004

Air pollution from coal burned in power plants is a major source of mercury in fish. If women follow the FDA's advice and eat one can of albacore tuna a week, hundreds of thousands more babies will be exposed to hazardous levels of mercury.

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News Release
Tuesday, December 9, 2003

EWG's analysis of mercury data obtained from FDA under the Freedom of Information Act reveals that mercury contamination of fish is more serious than federal scientists previously assumed. 

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Testimonies & Official Correspondence
Wednesday, July 30, 2003

The Environmental Working Group (EWG) today released results of the most extensive tests to date of cancer-causing polychlorinated biphenyl (PCBs) levels in farmed salmon consumed in the United States.

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News Release
Thursday, July 10, 2003

View and Download the report here: Tainted Catch

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Reports & Consumer Guides
Thursday, July 10, 2003

EWG asks the CEOs of nine major fast food corporations to disclose the use of toxic nonstick chemicals in their packaging.

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News Release
Monday, April 28, 2003

In the first-ever tests of perchlorate in supermarket produce, 18 percent of lettuce samples contained detectable levels of perchlorate, and an average serving of these contaminated samples contained 4 times more than the EPA says is safe in drinking water. EWG estimates that by eating lettuce, 1.6 million American women of childbearing age are exposed daily during the winter months to more perchlorate than the EPA’s recommended safe dose. EWG's findings of perchlorate in retail produce confirm previous tests on greenhouse-grown lettuce seedlings by the EPA and field-grown vegetables by a San Bernardino, Calif. farm whose irrigation water supplies were contaminated by defense contractor Lockheed Martin's abandoned rocket-testing facility.

 
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Reports & Consumer Guides
Monday, April 28, 2003

Correspondence regarding perchlorate contamination in food growth in the United States

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News Release
Monday, April 28, 2003

Lettuce grown in the fall and winter months in Southern California or Arizona may contain higher levels of toxic rocket fuel than is considered safe by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, according to independent laboratory tests commissioned by Environmental Working Group (EWG).

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News Release
Friday, March 1, 2002

Internal Food and Drug Administration (FDA) documents obtained by the Environmental Working Group (EWG) reveal that the agency is failing in its public health obligation to protect pregnant women and the developing fetus from the toxic effects of mercury.

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News Release
Friday, April 13, 2001

Government recommendations for fish consumption could expose more than one in four expectant mothers - 1 million women - to enough mercury to put the health of their fetuses at risk, according to a new computer investigation released today by the Environmental Working Group (EWG) and the U.S. Public Interest Research Group (U.S. PIRG).

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News Release
Sunday, April 1, 2001

On January 12, 2001, government health officials issued new advisories warning women to limit fish consumption during pregnancy to avoid exposing their unborn children to unsafe levels of methylmercury. Methylmercury can cross the placenta and cause learning deficits and developmental delays in children who are exposed even to relatively low levels in the womb. The principal exposure route for the fetus is fish consumption by the mother.

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Reports & Consumer Guides
Wednesday, September 6, 2000

The Organic Trade Association (OTA) today said ABC News intentions to announce a brief token apology on Friday's 20/20 falls far short of what the network must do to make amends to the organic industry.

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Key Issues:
News Release
Wednesday, September 6, 2000

After six months of stone-walling, ABC News yesterday confirmed an Environmental Working Group (EWG) allegation that the network did not conduct pesticide tests for a special "20/20" investigation by correspondent John Stossel that was harshly critical of organic food.

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Key Issues:
News Release

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