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Nonstick Chemicals

 

Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) was widely used to make non-stick cookware until it was linked to cancer, liver disease and other risks. Learn how EWG’s research helped get industry to phase it out.

Wednesday, June 20, 2018

A government report released today – which was suppressed by the Environmental Protection Agency, the Department of Defense and the White House for fear it would cause a “public relations nightmare” – recommends a much lower safe level for toxic fluorinated, or PFAS, chemicals than the EPA’s non-enforceable health advisory level.

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News Release
Thursday, June 7, 2018

Attached is a letter submitted by more than 50 public interest organizations calling on the Department of Health and Human Services to release a recent toxicological profile by the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry that assesses the

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Testimonies & Official Correspondence
Thursday, June 7, 2018

A wide-ranging coalition of public interest groups is calling for the immediate release of a suppressed federal study that says perfluorinated chemicals in drinking water are hazardous at much lower levels than the Environmental Protection Agency’s guidelines state.

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News Release
Monday, June 4, 2018

Mixtures of chemicals commonly found in consumer products are more likely to increase breast cancer risk than the same chemicals individually, according to a new analysis. But safety tests by government regulators don’t routinely evaluate the combined effects of multiple chemical exposures.

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News and Analysis
Article
Tuesday, May 22, 2018

At a so-called leadership summit today, Environmental Protection Agency chief Scott Pruitt said drinking water contaminated with toxic fluorinated chemicals is a “national priority.” But a new EWG report reveals that the EPA hasn’t even told Americans the true extent of the pollution, which is much worse than previously reported.

Photo courtesy of Gage Skidmore via Flickr.com

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News Release
Monday, May 14, 2018

The federal Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry is preparing to propose safe levels for fluorinated chemicals in drinking water nearly six times more stringent than the Environmental Protection Agency’s recommendation.

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News Release
Monday, May 7, 2018

The Defense Department has for the first time disclosed the locations of military installations where tap water or groundwater on or off base is contaminated with highly toxic fluorinated chemicals.

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News and Analysis
Article
Wednesday, April 18, 2018

The latest update of an interactive map by EWG and the Social Science Environmental Health Research Institute at Northeastern University documents publicly known PFAS pollution from 94 sites in 22 states, including industrial plants and dumps, military air bases, civilian airports and fire training sites. It also shows PFAS pollution of tap water for 16 million people in 33 states and Puerto Rico.  

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Reports & Consumer Guides
Wednesday, April 18, 2018

Two decades after pollution from highly toxic fluorinated chemicals was first reported in American communities and drinking water, the number of known contamination sites is growing rapidly, with no end in sight.

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News Release
Friday, April 13, 2018

EWG has submitted comments to the California Department of Toxic Substances Control on the agency’s proposed listing of carpets and rugs containing PFAS chemicals  as a priority product for review as part of the Safer Consumer Products Program.

 

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Testimonies & Official Correspondence
Monday, March 26, 2018

Exposure to fluorinated industrial chemicals, known as PFAS or PFC chemicals, may increase the amount of weight that people, especially women, regain after dieting, according to a new study by Harvard University researchers, published in PLOS Medicine. It found that women with higher levels of PFAS chemicals in their blood at the start of the study regained an average of 3.7 to 4.8 pounds more than women with lower levels of the chemicals in their blood.  

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News and Analysis
Article
Thursday, March 22, 2018

On Wednesday, Washington Gov. Jay Inslee signed the first state law to ban toxic fluorinated chemicals in food packaging, such as microwave popcorn bags, pizza boxes and fast-food wrappers.

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News and Analysis
Article
Tuesday, March 20, 2018

Environmental Protection Agency chief Scott Pruitt will hold a summit in May on the pervasive contamination of the nation’s drinking water with highly fluorinated chemicals.

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News Release
Tuesday, March 13, 2018

In a groundbreaking move, California has proposed that carpets and rugs containing the stain-resistant fluorinated chemicals known as PFAS should be considered a priority product under the state’s Safer Consumer Products program.

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News and Analysis
Article
Tuesday, February 6, 2018

EWG submits comments to New Jersey’s Department of Environmental Protection in support of the state’s proposal to lower the Maximum Contaminant Level for PFOS in drinking water.

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Testimonies & Official Correspondence
Thursday, November 30, 2017

It’s not just a poor diet and lack of exercise that can make kids overweight.

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News and Analysis
Article
Wednesday, November 29, 2017

The phaseout of a hazardous chemical formerly used to make Teflon has likely prevented thousands of low-weight births in the U.S. each year, saving billions of dollars in health care costs, says a new study from researchers at New York University.  

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News and Analysis
Article
Monday, November 27, 2017

How many times a day do you drink water? Cook with it? Brush your teeth with it? Offer some to your children?

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Children's Health
Article
Thursday, November 2, 2017

Last year, the Environmental Protection Agency reported that 1 percent of samples from public drinking water systems nationwide were contaminated with PFOA, a nonstick chemical formerly used to make DuPont's Teflon.

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News and Analysis
Article
Tuesday, September 26, 2017

Robert Bilott, the Ohio attorney who exposed DuPont's cover-up of the dangers of a cancer-causing Teflon chemical, is a 2017 laureate of the Right Livelihood Award, widely known as the "alternative Nobel Prize."

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News Release

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