Triclosan

Consumer products containing this antibacterial pesticide don’t protect you from germs or disease, but they do expose you to a hormone-disrupting chemical. EWG shows how to avoid it.

Friday, July 25, 2008

It might be in your toothbrush. Your socks. Your child's rattle. Then again - it might not be. But do you know for sure?

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News and Analysis
Article
Thursday, July 17, 2008

With no assessment of health risks to infants, federal regulators have approved a hormone-disrupting pesticide, triclosan, for use in 140 different types of consumer products including liquid hand soap, toothpaste, undergarments and children's toys. This exposure has been allowed despite the fact that the chemical ends up in mothers' breast milk and poses potential toxicity to fetal and childhood development.

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Reports & Consumer Guides
Thursday, July 17, 2008

Triclosan is an antibacterial chemical found in many products. Use EWG's Triclosan to identify and avoid this toxic chemical in dish soap, personal care and other antibacterial products.

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News and Analysis
Article
Thursday, July 17, 2008

Although most shoppers probably don't know it, "antibacterial" isn't just for soap anymore. From sports clothing to cutting boards, deodorants, and children's toys, a wide range of consumer products are now commonly treated with antimicrobial pesticides such as triclosan.

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News and Analysis
Article
Thursday, July 12, 2007

EWG and East Bay Municipal Utility District (EBMUD) researchers analyzed samples of wastewater from residential, commercial, and industrial sites in the San Francisco Bay Area. 18 of 19 wastewater samples examined contained at least 1 of 3 unregulated, widely-used hormone disruptors – phthalates, bisphenol A, and triclosan; 2 samples contained all 3 substances. Despite sophisticated wastewater treatment, these chemicals were detected in treated waters discharged into the Bay.

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Reports & Consumer Guides
Wednesday, October 19, 2005

An FDA panel is examining possible health concerns associated with antibacterial soaps, wipes and other household products. The market is booming for these germ-killers, but home use might be creating strains resistant to both antibacterials and antibiotics. This is of particular concern to families with children, as it presents the double-edged sword of exposing children to surviving super-germs, or, on the other hand, overprotecting them in a squeaky-clean environment that prevents them from building immunity, which can lead to asthma or allergies later in life.

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