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Toxics

Industry doesn’t have to test chemicals for safety before they go on the market. EWG steps in where government leaves off, giving you the resources to protect yourself and your family.

Wednesday, December 14, 2005

Today the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announced it will fine Teflon maker DuPont $16.5 million for two decades' worth of covering up company studies that showed it was polluting drinking water and newborn babies with an indestructible chemical that causes cancer, birth defects and other serious health problems in animals. The chemical is in the blood of over 95 percent of Americans.

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News Release
Tuesday, December 6, 2005
News and Analysis
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Monday, November 28, 2005
News and Analysis
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Wednesday, November 16, 2005

Breakdown chemicals from DuPont coatings and related sources are now in the blood of 95 percent of Americans, and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has spent the last several years trying to determine how they get there.

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News Release
Wednesday, November 9, 2005

Environmental Defence Canada has released "Toxic Nation" the first Canadian BodyBurden study, with 11 participants tested for 88 chemicals, including PCBs, fire retardants, PFOS (a chemical in the same family as the Teflon chemical PFOA) and heavy metals, all of which are suspected of causing cancer, birth defects, or reproductive or hormonal harm.

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News and Analysis
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Monday, November 7, 2005

DuPont disclosed in its SEC filing last week that the company earns $1 billion per year in revenues from the Teflon chemical PFOA or C8. Those revenues could be in danger if EPA decides to regulate the toxic chemical as a result of the agency's lawsuit against DuPont for withholding information about the Teflon chemical's health effects.

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News and Analysis
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Monday, November 7, 2005

The University of Montana has put out its annual Kids Count report for 2005, addressing child mortality, uninsurance rates, economic status and, for the first time, health care costs from environmental pollutants. Montana spends an estimated $400 million annually for kids with lead poisoning, asthma, cancer, birth defects and other disorders.

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News and Analysis
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Thursday, October 27, 2005

Prozac, antibiotics, health and beauty products, steroids, disinfectants, fire retardants, DEET, caffeine and more are increasingly being found in America's waterways.

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News and Analysis
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Tuesday, October 25, 2005

Residents near DuPont's W.Va. Washington Works plant, where the Teflon chemical PFOA is produced, are speaking out against a landfill where the company dumped the toxic chemical.

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News and Analysis
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Monday, October 24, 2005

Feeling good about donating your old computer for use by someone in another country? Then don't read Laurie J. Flynn's New York Times story about the finding that many of those donated electronics end up creating pollution, not opportunities, for people in developing nations.

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Friday, October 21, 2005

As if enough weren't wrong with Harriet Miers' Supreme Court nomination, Reuters reports that Miers spoke to several groups last spring to garner support for Sens. Specter and Leahy's ailing asbestos trust fund bill.

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Friday, October 21, 2005

 

The New York Times gets it wrong in an otherwise nice article about organic labeling of health and beauty products. Synthetic ingredients used in cosmetics are generally considered safe. The Food and Drug Administration requires that cosmetics makers make sure that their products are safe.
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News and Analysis
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Wednesday, October 19, 2005

An FDA panel is examining possible health concerns associated with antibacterial soaps, wipes and other household products. The market is booming for these germ-killers, but home use might be creating strains resistant to both antibacterials and antibiotics. This is of particular concern to families with children, as it presents the double-edged sword of exposing children to surviving super-germs, or, on the other hand, overprotecting them in a squeaky-clean environment that prevents them from building immunity, which can lead to asthma or allergies later in life.

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News and Analysis
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Tuesday, October 18, 2005

Grassroots opposition to proposals to fluoridate water supplies across the country are gathering community and state-level attention and support, a new piece in TIME Magazine shows.

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Thursday, October 13, 2005

Many baby and young children's products like teething rings, plastic and plush toys, clothing, and personal care products contain phthalates and fire retardants, a new study shows.

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Tuesday, October 11, 2005

Using a line straight from the chemical industry's playbook, California Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger vetoed a bill that would have established the nation's first state biomonitoring program last weekend.

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Wednesday, October 5, 2005

W.R. Grace strikes again, the Dallas Morning News reports, with news that up to 450 employees of the company's West Dallas plant and their families are at risk from asbestos-related illnesses.

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News and Analysis
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Monday, October 3, 2005

Ag-Mart Produce, the giant Florida tomato grower, is eliminating the use of some pesticides linked to birth defects following a lawsuit involving three seriously deformed babies born to field workers.

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News and Analysis
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Thursday, September 29, 2005

The Washington State Toxics Coalition and the Toxic-Free Legacy Coalition have started body burden testing on 10 people in the Puget Sound area, looking for pesticides, heavy metals, PCBs, fire retardants, phthalates and other toxics in their subjects' bodies.

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Wednesday, September 28, 2005

The Washington Post's Juliet Eilperin reports on a Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) study that shows that U.S. women living near a coast have higher levels than women living inland.

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