Water

Nothing is more important to your health and quality of life than safe drinking water and clean streams and lakes. Across the country, pollution from farms is one of the primary reasons water is no longer clean or safe. Agriculture is the leading source of pollution of rivers and streams surveyed by U.S. government experts, according to the Environmental Protection Agency. Thankfully, if we make simple changes in the way we farm, we can take a big step toward clean water.

Friday, January 7, 2011

Since 2005, Environmental Working Group (EWG) has been pushing the federal government and municipal water utilities to reduce the levels of fluoride in drinking water to protect children from tooth enamel damage ("dental fluorosis") and other potential health problems. Today  those concerns have been heard.  The nation's top health official, Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius has announced plans to lower the agency's maximum recommended fluoride level from 1.2 milligrams per liter of water to 0.7.

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News Release
Monday, January 3, 2011

For years, California officials have been working to set the nation's first-ever safety standard for the carcinogenic metal hexavalent chromium (chromium-6), commonly found in the state's drinking water. Last week (Dec. 31), after specifically evaluating the pollutant’s threat to infants, public health officials sharply lowered their proposed “public health goal” to 0.02 parts per billion (ppb) of chromium-6 in drinking water.

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News Release
Wednesday, December 22, 2010

Just two days after the release of Environmental Working Group's (EWG) analysis of chromium-6 (hexavalent chromium) contamination in the drinking water of 31 U.S. cities, the federal Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has issued a comprehensive plan to help local water utilities address the problem.

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News Release
Tuesday, December 21, 2010

By Rebecca Sutton, PhD, EWG Senior Scientist

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News and Analysis
Article
Monday, December 20, 2010

Millions of Americans are drinking water contaminated with the carcinogenic chemical that came to national attention in the 2000 feature film Erin Brockovich. Laboratory tests commissioned by EWG found hexavalent chromium, or chromium-6, in the drinking water of 31 of 35 selected U.S. cities. Among those with the highest levels were Norman, Okla.; Honolulu; and Riverside, Calif.

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News Release
Monday, December 20, 2010

Laboratory tests commissioned by EWG have detected hexavalent chromium, the carcinogenic “Erin Brockovich chemical,” in tap water from 31 of 35 American cities. The highest levels were in Norman, Okla.; Honolulu, Hawaii; and Riverside, Calif. In all, water samples from 25 cities contained the toxic metal at concentrations above the safe maximum recently proposed by California regulators.

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Reports & Consumer Guides
Wednesday, December 15, 2010

EWG comments on EPA’s review of toxicological studies for hexavalent chromium say that there is no need to weaken the conclusions or delay issuing the document.

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Testimonies & Official Correspondence
Tuesday, December 7, 2010

For more than thirty years, contamination from high-intensity farming has been adding to the pollution that fouls Chesapeake Bay, one of America’s most storied waterways. A new report from the Environmental Working Group today (Dec 7) shows that weakly regulated agricultural practices in the six states of the Chesapeake watershed are overloading soils with phosphorus, a major reason the bay is in trouble.

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AgMag
Article
Thursday, December 2, 2010

By Dusty Horwitt, EWG Senior Counsel

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AgMag
Article
Thursday, November 18, 2010

Everyone agrees: Chesapeake Bay is heavily polluted. Thirty years of promises, compromises, plans, schemes and a whole lot of taxpayer dollars have done little to clean up one of America's most storied watersheds. There’s plenty of blame to go around, and waste from urban sprawl is one factor. But the biggest threat to water quality in the Chesapeake is pollution from agriculture.

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AgMag
Article
Tuesday, September 28, 2010

Thanks to five decades of bad policy decisions, a quirk of geology underlaying hundreds of thousands of acres of California's Central Valley has snowballed into a multi-million dollar taxpayer boondoggle that continues to pose an environmental threat to the fragile San Francisco/San Joaquin Bay-Delta estuary.

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Reports & Consumer Guides
Monday, July 26, 2010

Hopes for comprehensive legislation to combat climate pollution evaporated Thursday (July 22) after months of wrangling in the Senate. In its place Senate leaders are proposing what is being billed as an “oil-spill only” bill with a few added energy provisions.

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AgMag
Article
Tuesday, July 13, 2010

EWG research found that the amount of dioxin a nursing infant ingests daily is up to 77 times higher than the level EPA has proposed to protect the endocrine and immune systems. The fact that both breast milk and formula are contaminated with dioxin highlights the urgent need for EPA to finish its assessment.

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News Release
Monday, July 12, 2010

Last week began with a front page story in the San Francisco Chronicle (July 5) detailing the links between increased fertilizer run-off due to corn ethanol production in the Mississippi River Basin to the swelling Dead Zone in the Gulf of Mexico.

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AgMag
Article
Wednesday, July 7, 2010

On the first of the July, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announced a plan to put everyone who lives or works in the Chesapeake Bay watershed on a "rigorous pollution diet" intended to cut back on the quantities of nitrogen and phosphorus runoff that have turned large portions of the bay into oxygen-deprived "dead zones."

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AgMag
Article
Thursday, June 3, 2010

North Carolinians could be exposed to much higher concentrations of a notorious Teflon chemical than the rest of the country under a proposed state regulation that would allow unsafe levels of the contaminant in drinking water, scientists at EWG warn.

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News Release
Thursday, May 27, 2010

On April 23, the Environmental Working Group’s Rebecca Sutton, PhD, submitted a letter to the Environmental Protection Agency articulating EWG’s support for the Agency's proposed pollution controls. Her letter also urged the EPA to step up its efforts to combat one of the biggest threats to the bay — phosphorous and nitrogen runoff from agriculture — as it goes forward with regulatory and enforcement strategies.

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AgMag
Article
Wednesday, April 28, 2010

In the three months since assuming the chairmanship of the Chesapeake Executive Council, Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Lisa Jackson has directed several encouraging new initiatives.

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AgMag
Article
Thursday, April 8, 2010

Chanda Chevannes has made an important documentary film about Sandra Steingraber's work, based largely on her first book, Living Downstream. The trailer below will give you a sense of Steingraber's belief that our focus should not be downstream, where we see only symptoms, but rather upstream, where we can see causes. And prevent them.

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News and Analysis
Article
Monday, April 5, 2010

Finally, our climate change champions in the U.S. Senate are defending the long-suffering natural gas industry from the latest round of ridiculously burdensome drinking water protections.  From what we hear the Senate’s draft climate bill may call for no regulation of the industry under the Safe Drinking Water Act.  It’s about time.

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AgMag
Article

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