Water

Nothing is more important to your health and quality of life than safe drinking water and clean streams and lakes. Across the country, pollution from farms is one of the primary reasons water is no longer clean or safe. Agriculture is the leading source of pollution of rivers and streams surveyed by U.S. government experts, according to the Environmental Protection Agency. Thankfully, if we make simple changes in the way we farm, we can take a big step toward clean water.

Friday, December 13, 2002

Secret tests conducted in 1984 by the DuPont chemical company found a Teflon-related contaminant (C8) in the tap water of the Little Hocking Water Association in Ohio, just across the river from the company’s Teflon plant in Parkersburg, West Virginia. But the company never told the community, its water utility or state regulators about the tap water testing program, which continued through at least 1989, or about the positive findings.

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Reports & Consumer Guides
Thursday, December 12, 2002
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Reports & Consumer Guides
Tuesday, December 10, 2002

On Dec. 10 the Environmental Working Group and the Environmental Law Foundation released the results of tests on water purchased from 274 Glacier vending machines in California. Analysis of the samples found that water from more than a third of the machines failed California standards for trihalomethanes (THMs) in vended water.

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News Release
Tuesday, December 10, 2002

Statement by Brian McInerney, President and CEO of Glacier Water Services, Inc.

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News Release
Tuesday, November 12, 2002

"Contamination of drinking water supplies by the toxic industrial chemical perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA, or C8) is a continuing concern to the residents of Parkersburg and surrounding areas of Wood County near the source of the pollution, DuPont’s manufacturing operation in Washington, West Virginia."

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Testimonies & Official Correspondence
Tuesday, January 8, 2002

The first ever nationwide assessment of chlorination byproducts in drinking water, released by the Environmental Working Group and U.S. Public Interest Research Group, shows that more than one hundred thousand women are at elevated risk of miscarriage or of having children with birth defects because of chlorination byproducts (CBPs) in municipal tap water.

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AgMag
Article
Tuesday, January 8, 2002

First-ever nationwide assessment of chlorination byproducts in tapwater finds 137,000 U.S. pregnancies at higher risk of miscarriage, birth defects

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News Release
Monday, October 1, 2001

Chlorinating tap water is a critical public health measure that saves thousands of lives each year by reducing the incidence of waterborne disease. But chlorination is no substitute for cleaning up America’s waters.

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Reports & Consumer Guides
Monday, July 16, 2001

Sources of drinking water for more than 7 million Californians and unknown millions of other Americans are contaminated with a chemical that disrupts child development and may cause thyroid cancer, but is unregulated by the state or federal government, according to an investigation by Environmental Working Group (EWG).

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News Release
Sunday, July 1, 2001

California regulators have failed to order cleanup or take other legally binding enforcement action on more than 90 percent of the thousands of underground fuel storage tanks known to be leaking toxic chemicals into water and soil throughout the state, although many of the leaks were first reported more than 10 years ago, according to an Environmental Working Group (EWG) computer-assisted investigation. Even when cleanup was ordered, regulators almost never fined even the biggest polluters.

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Reports & Consumer Guides
Monday, July 17, 2000

The state has almost never ordered cleanup or assessed fines for the thousands of underground gasoline storage tanks leaking MTBE and other toxic chemicals into California’s water and soil, even when the leaks have been known for more than 10 years, according to a study by Environmental Working Group (EWG).

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News Release
Thursday, June 29, 2000

Half of major industrial water polluters in California are operating with expired pollution permits, according to state and federal data analyzed by Environmental Working Group (EWG) and Friends of the Earth (FOE).

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News Release
Thursday, June 29, 2000

Half of major industrial water polluters in California are operating with expired pollution permits, according to state and federal data analyzed by Environmental Working Group (EWG) and Friends of the Earth (FOE).

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News Release
Wednesday, March 1, 2000

Half of major industrial water polluters in California are operating with expired pollution permits, according to an analysis of clean water enforcement data by Environmental Working Group (EWG) and Friends of the Earth (FOE). Facilities operating under expired permits include most of the state’s oil refineries and a number of power plants that are dumping a toxic soup of chemicals into the ocean, bays and rivers, including dioxin, lead, mercury, cyanide, arsenic and PCBs.

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Reports & Consumer Guides
Wednesday, March 1, 2000

At the heart of the nation’s Clean Water Act is a system of permits that determines how much pollution every factory, machine shop, electric utility, sewage treatment plant or other polluter can dump into the nation’s waters. These permits, which set the terms for all of the nation’s water pollution, are tailored to the size of the polluter, the toxicity or threat of the pollution, the technology available to clean it up, and the quality and size of the waterway receiving the discharges.

 

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Reports & Consumer Guides
Monday, January 31, 2000

An analysis of federal enforcement records shows that large industrial polluters in OhioMichigan and Pennsylvania are routinely breaking the law -- and getting away with it. Big water polluters are almost never fined for their violations, and when they are fined, the penalties are often too low to act as a deterrent to future pollution. For many big polluters, breaking clean water laws has become standard business practice.

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Reports & Consumer Guides
Wednesday, September 1, 1999

Across Ohio, small and large businesses have polluted public drinking water supplies with impunity. An Environmental Working Group analysis of Ohio EPA data and an internal, unpublished report from the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency (Ohio EPA) shows that industries have contaminated at least 54 public water supplies, but have been held responsible for contributing toward cleanup in only three cases.

 

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Reports & Consumer Guides
Thursday, July 1, 1999

n a little-noticed decision earlier this year, the EPA’s top scientific committee on children’s health declared that protections against the toxic weed killer atrazine in food and water should not be considered safe for infants and children. According to the Office of Children’s Health Protection Advisory Committee:

 

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Reports & Consumer Guides
Wednesday, June 30, 1999

Atrazine, the most heavily used herbicide in the United States, is a cancer-causing weed killer applied to 50 million acres of corn each year. After it is applied each spring, it runs off cornfields and through drinking water plants into the tap water of millions of Midwestern homes.

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AgMag
Article
Thursday, October 1, 1998

The federal government and the states have adopted a high- cost, high-risk strategy in their drinking water programs, where consumers pay water suppliers to try to make polluted water drinkable. In spite of the vigorous efforts of drinking water providers, tap water made from dirty rivers and lakes is often host to multiple toxic chemicals, or is contaminated with the by-products of the clean-up process itself.

 

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Reports & Consumer Guides

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