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EWG News Roundup (3/22): Kale Vaults Up the Dirty Dozen™ List, California Takes on Chemicals in Cosmetics and More

In the News
Friday, March 22, 2019

This week, EWG released our 2019 installment of the Shopper’s Guide to Pesticides in Produce™. The major stories coming out of this year’s guide were strawberries topping the Dirty Dozen™ list once again and the meteoric rise of kale up to third on the Dirty Dozen list. Kale's ascension was due to Department of Agriculture testing data that shows the presence of the potentially cancer-causing pesticide Dacthal in more than half of the samples, even after they were thoroughly washed.

“We were surprised kale had so many pesticides on it, but the test results were unequivocal,” said EWG Toxicologist Alexis Temkin, Ph.D. “Fruits and vegetables are an important part of everyone’s diet, and when it comes to some conventionally grown produce items, such as kale, choosing organic may be a better option.”

Landmark legislation was introduced this week in California that would ban the use in cosmetics sold in the state of 20 highly toxic chemicals known to cause cancer, reproductive harm or hormone disruption.

EWG also analyzed global regulations on cosmetics and personal care products and found that more than 40 countries have regulations for these products on the books, but the U.S. does not. This country could join the list soon if recently introduced federal legislation is passed that gives the FDA more power to review and, if needed, regulate or even ban chemicals of concern.

Source: EWG, from the EU, ASEAN, MERCOSUR, Japan, Australia, South Korea and Canada.

EWG recently submitted a Freedom of Information Act request to the Department of Defense, seeking information on how many current and former military installations have ground and surface water contaminated by toxic fluorinated chemicals. In response, the Army requested the whopping sum of $300,000 for the data. This week, EWG filed an administrative appeal of the Army’s fee request.

Also this week, a jury in California ruled in favor of a plaintiff who was suing Monsanto and Bayer AG, arguing that glyphosate, the main ingredient in Monsanto’s Roundup weedkiller, was the cause of his non-Hodgkin lymphoma.

In additional glyphosate news, Los Angeles County announced on Wednesday that the weedkilling chemical would be banned from further use by all county departments.

Federal legislation was introduced this week that aims to stomp out asbestos from personal care products.

And finally, the Environmental Protection Agency dropped a confusing rulemaking on notorious carcinogen formaldehyde this week. Experts at EWG interpreted EPA’s actions as an attempt to delay restrictions that can be put in place to regulate the cancer-causing chemical.

Here’s some news you can use going into the weekend.

2019 Shopper’s Guide to Pesticides in Produce

CBS This Morning: Pesticides in Produce [VIDEO]

Strawberries, spinach and kale top "dirty dozen" list: How to minimize pesticide intake. 

CBS News: Kale added to annual list of fruits and veggies with most pesticides

The ranking, dubbed the Dirty Dozen, is released each year by the Environmental Working Group. The nonprofit consumer advocacy organization uses more than 40,000 produce samples tested by the Food and Drug Administration and the U.S. Department of Agriculture in compiling its list

CBS News: Pesticide alert: 12 most contaminated fruits and veggies

You've long been told to eat your fruits and veggies - the government's new food guidelines even recommend filling half your plate with them. But pesticide residues can pose a health risk - so watch out when you consume the fruits and veggies on the Environmental Working Group's latest "Dirty Dozen" list of most contaminated produce. Keep clicking to see which produce item is the dirtiest of them all.

CNBC: Kale is now one of the most pesticide-contaminated vegetables

Often touted for being highly nutritious, kale has joined the list of 11 other fruits and vegetables known to be “dirty,” according to an analysis by the Environmental Working Group. Reprinted by NECNNBC4 (D.C.)NBC New YorkNBC BostonNBC ChicagoNBC Los AngelesNBC San DiegoNBC Miami, and 18 other media outlets.  

 CNN: Kale joins the ranks of the annual 'Dirty Dozen' pesticide list

Kale, that popular green of the health conscious, has joined the ignoble list of 12 fruits and vegetables with the most pesticide residues, according to the Environmental Working Group. The last time kale was on the list was in 2009 when it was ranked eighth. Strawberries and spinach took the top two spots again this year, respectively, followed by kale.

CNN: The 2019 pesticide 'Dirty Dozen' fruits and vegetables

Each year, the Environmental Working Group releases a "Dirty Dozen" list of fruits and vegetables that contain the highest level of residual pesticides as noted in government tests. Past Pesticide Data Program reports issued by the US Department of Agriculture indicated that when pesticide residues are found on foods, they are nearly always at levels below the human tolerance limits set by the US Environmental Protection Agency.

CNN: 2019 ‘Clean 15’ Fruits and Vegetables

Every year, the Environmental Working Group releases a list of the ‘Clean Fifteen’ fruits and vegetables. For 2019, avocados top the list of produce that contain the least pesticide residue.

Los Angeles Times: New produce guide shows eating kale is a lot dirtier than you think

Kale, strawberries and spinach top the Environmental Working Group’s list of the 12 fruits and vegetables with the most pesticide residue. The list, called the Dirty Dozen, is released each year by the nonprofit consumer advocacy group. Reprinted by The San Diego Union-Tribune.

USA Today: Pesticides in food: Strawberries, spinach, kale have the most residue, a new report finds

The leafy greens are ranked second and third, respectively, on Environmental Working Group's Dirty Dozen, a list of the fruits and vegetables with the most pesticide residue. At the top of the advocacy group's latest roster, released Wednesday, is strawberries; nectarines and apples round out the top five.

Fortune: Kale Might Not Be As Healthy As You Think

Kale ranked third on the Environmental Working Group’s list of fruits and vegetables with the most pesticide residues. That was a big jump for the leafy green, which hasn’t appeared at all on the list since 2009.

People: Kale Named One of the Most Pesticide-Covered Produce Items at the Grocery Store in New Report

Hate kale? You might enjoy this. A new report from the Environmental Working Group (EWG) suggests that the leafy green is one of the most pesticide-covered produce items at the supermarket. Reprinted by People en Espanol and Yahoo!.

TIME magazine: Kale Is One of the Most Contaminated Vegetables You Can Buy. Here's Why

Each year, the Environmental Working Group (EWG) publishes its Dirty Dozen list, which ranks the 12 pieces of produce that contain the highest amounts of pesticide residues.

TIME magazine: A Mother's Exposure to Pesticides During Pregnancy May Raise Children's Autism Risk

The Environmental Working Group recently published its annual list of the most pesticide-heavy produce, as well as those that have fewer pesticide residues. Choosing organic produce can help, too.

Better Homes & Gardens: These 12 Foods Are Most Likely to Carry Pesticide Residue, Even After You Wash Them

Unless you’re buying organic, there’s probably more pesticides present on your fruits and veggies than you’d think. The Environmental Working Group (EWG) just released their 2019 Dirty Dozen list, which shows which fruits and veggies are the most contaminated with residues from pesticides according to research by the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

Business Insider: Kale might be bad for you in some cases — here’s when you should be careful about eating it

If you regularly eat kale, it might also be a good idea to make sure you wash it thoroughly. The Environmental Working Group just released its “Dirty Dozen” list for the year, which is a guide to the products that are covered in the most pesticides. It found that kale had the highest pesticide residues compared to nearly all other produce found on supermarket shelves in the US. Reprinted by This is Insider and 12 other media outlets.

The Daily Mail: Nearly 70% of fruits and veg have pesticide residue on them even AFTER being washed - including kale and strawberries

Strawberries, spinach and kale claimed the top three spots of the Environmental Working Group's (EWG) annual Dirty Dozen list, which ranks the most pesticide-heavy produce.

Environmental Health News: Spinach, strawberries and kale top annual report on the most pesticide-tainted produce

If you're going to buy organic, strawberries, spinach, kale, nectarines and apples might be a good place to start. Those are the top five U.S. fruits and vegetables most tainted with pesticides, according to the annual Shopper's Guide to Pesticides in Produce report from the nonprofit Environmental Working Group.

FOX Business: Kale rejoins the 'Dirty Dozen' list as one of the most contaminated with pesticides

On Wednesday, the Environmental Working Group released its annual Shopper's Guide to Pesticides in Produce, which analyzes Department of Agriculture test data to identify which supermarket produce have the most --and least-- contamination. Researchers said they were shocked that kale made the list this year.

The Guardian: Pesticide residues found in 70% of produce sold in US even after washing

According to the Environmental Working Group’s annual analysis of US Department of Agriculture data, strawberries, spinach and kale are among the most pesticide-heavy produce, while avocados, sweetcorn and pineapples had the lowest level of residues.

Health: The EWG Just Released Their Dirty Dozen List of the Most Contaminated Produce and Kale Is Shockingly High

Not only does kale rank third in the Environmental Working Group's (EWG) annual report, but it actually has higher pesticide residues than nearly all other produce found on supermarket shelves. Yikes!

The Hill: Advocacy group: 70 percent of US produce retains pesticide residues after being washed

About 70 percent of U.S. produce retains pesticide residues even after washing, according to a new study by the Environmental Working Group (EWG).

MarketWatch: Over 92% of kale samples contained two or more pesticides, study finds

Kale ranked as a third-worst fruit or vegetable behind strawberries and spinach when it comes to pesticide contamination, according to the Environmental Working Group’s annual “Dirty Dozen” report. Over 92% of kale samples were found to have two or more pesticide residues — and a single piece of kale could have up to 18 pesticides on or in it. Reprinted by MorningStar.

The Mercury News (San Jose, Calif.): Kale joins the pesticide-laden ranks of the Dirty Dozen

Kale came out of nowhere on this year’s Dirty Dozen after not making last year’s list at all. The Environmental Working Group (EWG), a nonprofit organization focused on human health and the environment, has produced the report annually since 2004. The entire list, which includes peaches, cherries and nectarines, can be found here. But what’s up with kale? Reprinted by East Bay Times.

MinnPost: Kale joins strawberries and other fruits and veggies on annual ‘Dirty Dozen’ pesticide list

The list was published Wednesday by the Environmental Working Group (EWG), a nonprofit, nonpartisan environmental organization, as part of its annual “Shopper’s Guide to Pesticides in Produce.” The guide also includes a “Clean Fifteen” list — the fruits and veggies least likely to be contaminated with pesticides.

MSN: 'Dirty Dozen' list: Fruits and vegetables with highest pesticide residue

Each year, the American non-profit research organization Environmental Working Group releases its “Dirty Dozen” list, featuring fruits and vegetables that rank highest in pesticide residue.

New York Post: Kale added to 2019 ‘Dirty Dozen’ list and consumers should ‘be alarmed’

After years as clean eating’s poster child, kale is now on the Dirty Dozen 2019, an annual list of the most pesticide-ridden fruits and vegetables, released Wednesday by the Environmental Working Group (EWG). Reprinted by FOX News

The Oregonian: Kale joins ‘Dirty Dozen’ list of produce with the most pesticide contamination; will you stop eating it? (poll)

Thinking of digging into a kale salad at lunch today? You may want to think twice. According to the health advocacy organization the Environmental Working Group, the popular leafy green has higher pesticide residue than almost all produce that’s found at the grocery store. Reprinted by the Bend Bulletin.

POPSUGAR: Kale Is One of the Dirtiest Vegetables, According to the EWG's 2019 “Dirty Dozen” List

If you're trying to eat healthy but save money, a good rule of thumb has been to splurge only on organic produce that notoriously contains large amounts of pesticides. The Environmental Working Group (EWG) makes this easier by releasing a list every year called the “Dirty Dozen,” which names the 12 pieces of produce that contain the most pesticides. Stick to EWG's “Clean 15” list for everything that's OK to buy nonorganic. Reprinted by Yahoo! News.

Prevention: “Dirty Dozen” Foods List Has a Surprising New Offender, EWG Report Confirms

But how do you choose the most crucial fruits and vegetables to seek out? Well, a 2019 report from the Environmental Working Group (EWG) is breaking down the top pesticide-ladened produce—known as the Dirty Dozen—to help steer you in the right direction.

Reader’s Digest: 20 Produce Mistakes You Didn’t Know You Were Making

Each year, the nonprofit Environmental Working Group (EWG) releases the Shopper’s Guide to Pesticides in Produce so customers can figure out where to spend extra for organic and which fruits and veggies are safe to buy conventionally grown.

Romper: 2019's List of Fruits & Veggies With The Most Pesticides Includes Kale & Strawberries

When it comes to eating healthfully, it's become common knowledge that we should be stocking up our plates with fruits and vegetables. But not all produce is made equally, it turns out. In fact, the Environmental Working Group's 2019 list of fruits and veggies with the most pesticides has been released and it includes many meal-time staples.

Well+Good: Kale just joined the “Dirty Dozen” pesticide list for the first time in a decade

The Environmental Working Group (EWG) just released its rankings for the 2019 Dirty Dozen, a guide to pesticides and produce. Kale finds itself on the list for the first time since 2009, ranking third, right behind strawberries and spinach. Every year, the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) tests 47 popular fruits and veggies, mimicking how a typical person might prepare produce at home.

B98.5 (Maine): Beware These Dirty Dozen Fruits & Vegetables

The Environmental Working Group has produced a report annually since 2004 that focuses on what is healthy and what is not in the world of fruits & veggies, and offer warnings for those that score poorly.

BIG 96.3 (Ontario, Canada):'Dirty Dozen': Do these fruits and veggies really have harmful amounts of pesticide?

According to the Environmental Working Group’s 2019 “Dirty Dozen” list — a report that tests pesticide residue levels on produce — strawberries have the highest levels of pesticides, followed by spinach and kale.

Jefferson Public Radio (Southern Oregon University): Thu 8:30 | More News Of Pesticides On Food

Shopping trips always bear interesting results for the Environmental Working Group. It's become a frequent occurrence: EWG purchases groceries and tests them for pesticides.  And the tests frequently show the presence of pesticides. 

WTOP (D.C.): Wake-up kale: Group says trendy green teeming with pesticides

It’s one of the trendiest greens on supermarket shelves and turns up in salads pasta dishes and even smoothies. But a new report from the Environmental Working Group finds the leafy green kale contains more pesticide residue than most other kinds of produce.

ABC4: KITV (Honolulu, Hawaii.): Strawberries top the list of dirtiest produce in the U.S.

Strawberries are one of the dirtiest produce in the U.S. The Environmental Working Group released its "Dirty dozen" list of fruits and veggies. 

ABC5: WCVB (Boston, Mass.): What is 'organic'?

Trying to eat healthier can be overwhelming, but there are some helpful tools that can make it easier. The Environmental Working Group issues a list every year to help consumers reduce their exposure to pesticides from produce.

ABC6: WPVI (Philadelphia, Penn.): Strawberries top "dirty dozen" list

The Environmental Working Group has released its "dirty dozen" list of fruits and vegetables. Strawberries came in first, meaning they're the item most tainted with pesticide residue.

ABC7: KABC (Los Angeles, Calif.): 'Dirty Dozen 2019': List ranks fruits, vegetables with the most pesticides

Just how safe is the food in your kitchen? The Environmental Working Group released its annual “Dirty Dozen” list of fruits and vegetables. The list includes the top 12 veggies and fruits found to have highest amount of pesticide residue. Reprinted by ABC7 (Chicago, Ill.)ABC13 (Houston, Texas)ABC28 (Tampa Bay, Fla.)ABC30 (Fresno, Calif.) and 11 other ABC affiliates and Yahoo! News.

ABC7: WKBW (Buffalo, N.Y.): Study: Pesticides found in 70% of washed produce

The Environmental Working Group has released it's annual list of fruits and vegetables that are most likely to contain pesticides known as “The Dirty Dozen”. Reprinted by 8 E.W. Scripps TV stations.

ABC8: WMTW (Westbrooke, Maine): Strawberries, spinach top 'Dirty Dozen' list

The Environmental Working Group released its Dirty Dozen list of fruits and vegetables with the most pesticide residue.

ABC8: WFAA (Dallas, Texas): Strawberries, spinach among produce with most pesticide residue, study finds

According to a newly released report from the Environmental Working Group, nearly 70 percent of the produce sold in the U.S. come with pesticide residue.

ABC12: KSAT (San Antonio, Texas): List of dirtiest, cleanest fruits, vegetables just might surprise you

In case you’re wondering, all of the produce was washed and peeled, just as someone would do when preparing the food at home, proving, the Environmental Working Group says, that simple washing does not necessarily remove all pesticides. Reprinted by WDIV (Detroit, Mich.). WJAX (Jacksonville, Fla.), WKMG (Orlando, Fla), WSLS (Roanoke, Va.) and 4 more Graham Media group stations.

CBS2: WLNY (New York, NY): Kale Joins ‘Dirty Dozen’ List Of Fruits And Vegetables Most Likely To Contain Pesticides

Kale, that popular green of the health conscious consumer, has joined the list of 12 fruits and vegetables with the most pesticide residues, according to the Environmental Working Group. Reprinted by CBS BaltimoreCBS ChicagoCBS HoustonCBS Los AngelesCBS San Francisco and 15 other local CBS stations.

CBS2: WLNY (New York, N.Y.): Is There Dirty Produce In Your Kitchen?

The "Environmental Working Group" has revealed its list of produce covered with the most pesticides.

CBS5: KPIX (San Francisco, Calif.): Kale Placed 3rd On ‘Dirty Dozen’ Produce Pesticide List [VIDEO]

Data from the U.S. Department of Agriculture shows that kale is one of the top crops affected by pesticides. The leafy green vegetable has been placed at the number three spot on the Environmental Working Group’s “Dirty Dozen” list. “Studies link pesticides to a host of human health problems including brain and nervous system toxicity, also hormone disruption, even cancer have been linked to pesticides,” said Samara Geller of Environmental Working Group.

CBS10: WTAJ (Altoona, Penn.): A new study says strawberries, spinach, and kale are the 'dirtiest' produce'

Bad news for Popeye the Sailor Man.....it turns out there is a lot of pesticide. The Environmental Working Group released its "dirty dozen" list of fruits and vegetables. Strawberries came in first -- meaning they're the most tainted with pesticide residue.
Spinach and Kale are in second and third place.

CBS12: WPEC (West Palm Beach, Fla.): New report reveals top produce with pesticides

Some of the most popular and healthiest fruits and vegetables that Americans eat every day have pesticides, according to a new report. The Environmental Working Group released its “Shopper's guide to pesticides in produce.”

FOX13: WTVT (Tampa, Fla.): Kale, strawberries, spinach top ‘Dirty Dozen' list for pesticide contamination

You might want to rethink that kale smoothie, because the popular vegetable that serves as a staple in “clean eating” meal plans just made it onto the Environmental Working Group’s annual ranking of the most pesticide-ridden fruits and vegetables, otherwise known as the “Dirty Dozen.” Reprinted by FOX11 (Los Angeles, Calif.),  FOX2 (Detroit, Mich.), FOX7 (Austin, Texas)FOX10 (Phoenix, Ariz.), FOX32 (Chicago, Ill.), and 10 other local FOX stations.

NBC2: WGRZ (Buffalo, N.Y.): Strawberries, spinach among produce with most pesticide residue, study finds

According to a newly released report from the Environmental Working Group, nearly 70 percent of the produce sold in the U.S. come with pesticide residue. Reprinted by Tegna stations  NBC9: KUSA (Denver, Colo.), NBC10: WTSP (Tampa, Fla.),  NBC12: KPNX (Phoenix, Ariz.), NBC23: KAGS (Bryan, Texas), and 35 other affiliates.

NBC25: WEYI (Flint, Mich.): REPORT: Strawberries, spinach, kale are top 3 produce items containing pesticides

According to the Environmental Working Group, they are the top three items containing pesticides. According to the report, early 70 percent of the produce sold in the United States contains pesticide residue.

News8: WTNH (New Haven, Conn.): Study: Strawberries, spinach, and kale are the 'dirtiest' produce

The Environmental Working Group released its "dirty dozen" list of fruits and vegetables. Strawberries came in first -- meaning they're the most tainted with pesticide residue. Spinach and Kale are in second and third place. Reprinted by 17 Nextstar Media stations.

News 12 New Jersey (Edison, N.J.): How clean is the food in your kitchen? – ‘Dirty Dozen’ list of fruits, veggies released

The Environmental Working Group has released its "Dirty Dozen" list of fruits and veggies. According to the list, strawberries came in first, meaning they're the item most tainted with pesticide residue. 

Congress and Rep DeLauro’s Glyphosate Bill

The Western Producer: U.S. bill would ban pre-harvest glyphosate on oats

The language in the Keep Food Safe from Glyphosate Act is similar to arguments made by the Environmental Working Group, which is well known for its annual Dirty Dozen report — a list of food with high levels of pesticide residues. Critics say the EWG is nothing but a lobby group for the organic food industry. 

Guilty Verdict for Monsanto’s Glyphosate

Business Insider: A jury says that a common weed-killer chemical at the heart of an $80 million lawsuit contributed to a man’s cancer

In 2018, the nonprofit Environmental Working Group (EWG) discovered traces of glyphosate in dozens of Quaker, Kellogg's, and General Mills products, including cereals like Cheerios and Lucky Charms. Reprinted by SFGateSeattle PIThe Telegraph and 22 other media outlets.

The Guardian: Monsanto: Roundup substantial factor in man’s cancer, jury finds in key verdict

Environmental advocates were quick to celebrate the verdict. Ken Cook, the president of the Environmental Working Group, said the ruling supported previous conclusions that “glyphosate causes cancer in people”. Reprinted by Yahoo! Finance and Daily Magazine.

The Hill: LA County bans Monsanto weed killer citing health concerns

“Kicking Bayer-Monsanto and its cancer-causing weedkiller off L.A. County property was absolutely the right call,” Environmental Working Group President Ken Cook said in a statement. “We know glyphosate causes cancer in people and shouldn’t be sprayed anywhere – period. We don’t know how many Angelenos have been exposed to this dangerous chemical through its use by the county, but we can keep others from being exposed.”

The Hill: Overnight Energy: Interior chief moves to protect access to public lands | Dem rolls out climate plan meant to appeal to GOP | LA County bans weed killer Roundup

“Kicking Bayer-Monsanto and its cancer-causing weedkiller off L.A. County property was absolutely the right call,” Environmental Working Group President Ken Cook said in a statement. “We know glyphosate causes cancer in people and shouldn't be sprayed anywhere – period. We don't know how many Angelenos have been exposed to this dangerous chemical through its use by the county, but we can keep others from being exposed.”

NBC Bay Area: A jury says that a common weed-killer chemical at the heart of an $80 million lawsuit contributed to a man’s cancer [VIDEO]

Samara Geller is interviewed in the segment. 

NBC5: KOBI (Medford, Ore.): Monsanto loses Roundup lawsuit

Senior researcher with the Environmental Working Group Samara Geller said, “We are not surprised given that Monsanto has a long history of environmental misconduct.”

Truthout: Jury Finds Monsanto’s Roundup Guilty of Causing Cancer

“Today’s verdict reinforces what another jury found last year, and what scientists with the state of California and the World Health Organization have concluded: Glyphosate causes cancer in people,” Environmental Working Group president Ken Cook said in a statement, referring to the active ingredient in Roundup. “As similar lawsuits mount, the evidence will grow that Roundup is not safe, and that the company has tried to cover it up.”

Asbestos in Cosmetics

Market Watch: The scare over contaminated children’s makeup at Claire’s now has the attention of Congress

“They would have to demonstrate to the FDA that they used a very refined method to test for the presence of asbestos,” Scott Faber, senior vice president of government affairs at the nonprofit watchdog Environmental Working Group told MarketWatch. He said companies would also have to show that their cosmetics were free of the toxin under the bill. Reprinted by MorningStar.

Washington Examiner: Set for a makeover?

“It very well may be the case that many of the ingredients used in cosmetics are perfectly safe to use and we know that many companies are trying to do the right thing,” said Melanie Benesh, legislative attorney at the Environmental Working Group, which is pushing for broader regulation. “But we shouldn't have a regulatory honor system where we as consumers are simply trusting companies to do the right thing.”

WPRI (Providence, R.I.): Lawmakers want warning labels on kids' makeup unless it is guaranteed asbestos-free

Scott Faber, from the Environmental Working Group, said the organization supports the legislation. “Thousands of products with talc could contain asbestos,” Faber said in a statement. “Consumers may soon know whether these products, widely used by American kids, are contaminated with a known carcinogen that is responsible for the deaths of hundreds of thousands of Americans.”

Simplemost: Claire’s Recalls Makeup After The FDA Found Asbestos In The Products

“Cosmetics have largely fallen into a regulatory black hole,” Scott Faber, the senior vice president of government affairs at the Environmental Working Group, said in his sworn testimony. “Cosmetics manufacturers do not have to register with FDA, do not have to report ingredients, do not have to report adverse events.”

California Cosmetics Bill
Fast Company: Landmark bill would ban cosmetics with toxic ingredients

A recent report by the Environmental Working Group (EWG) found that U.S. regulation of chemicals and contaminants in cosmetics dramatically falls behind 40 other nations.

FOX News: California bill would ban sale of makeup containing cancer-causing chemicals, toxins

“Many cosmetics companies are already reformulating their products to exclude these dangerous chemicals, but it’s important to establish a floor other companies can’t drop below,” Ken Cook, president of Environmental Working Group, one of the bill’s sponsor, said in a press release.

The Hill: California legislators consider banning all cosmetics with cancer-causing chemicals

“Toxic chemicals that cause cancer or reproductive harm have no place in any consumer products, especially those that adults and children alike apply to their bodies every day,” said Susan Little, senior California advocate for government affairs of the Environmental Working Group.

The Hill: Overnight Energy: California weighs banning cosmetics with cancer-causing chemicals

“Toxic chemicals that cause cancer or reproductive harm have no place in any consumer products, especially those that adults and children alike apply to their bodies every day,” said Susan Little, senior California advocate for government affairs of the Environmental Working Group.

Conscious Living TV: This New California Bill Could Ban Toxic Cosmetics

Assembly Bill 495, authored by Assemblymembers Al Muratsuchi (D-Torrance) and Buffy Wicks (D-Oakland), states that cosmetics products containing toxic chemicals like mercury, lead, phthalates, formaldehyde, triclosan and the fluorinated compounds known as PFAS are “adulterated cosmetics” that may not be sold in California. The legislation is sponsored by Environmental Working Group and CALPIRG.

East County Magazine: Calif. Bill Would Ban Cosmetics with Chemicals Lined to Cancer or Reproductive Harm

Assembly Bill 495, authored by Assemblymembers Al Muratsuchi (D-Torrance) and Buffy Wicks (D-Oakland), states that cosmetics products containing toxic chemicals like mercury, lead, phthalates, formaldehyde, triclosan and the fluorinated compounds known as PFAS are “adulterated cosmetics” that may not be sold in California. The legislation is sponsored by Environmental Working Group and CALPIRG.

Environmental Protection Agency

CNN: EPA head says clean-water access is 'biggest environmental threat' -- despite regulation rollbacks

The water supplies for nearly 110 million Americans may be contaminated with PFAS chemicals, according to the Environmental Working Group.

EPA and TSCA

CNN: EPA bans household use of deadly paint stripper, but not commercial use

But the Environmental Working Group criticized the administration for making "a significant retreat" and not extending the ban to commercial uses. EWG attorney Melanie Benesh accused the administration of "catering to the wishes of the chemical industry. 

Chemical Watch: NGOs blast TSCA formaldehyde prioritisation as 'confusing and deceptive'

But the Environmental Working Group characterised the move as “confusing and deceptive”. “Under the guise of taking action, the decision likely will have the effect of delaying further restrictions on its use,” said EWG legislative attorney Melanie Benesh.

Chemical Watch: US EPA bans methylene chloride in consumer paint removers

Environmental Working Group legislative attorney Melanie Benesh agreed: “The Trump administration will be partly to blame when the next worker is injured or dies as a result of being exposed to this extremely dangerous chemical.”

PFAS Contamination of Military Bases

Associated Press: Army bill for public records on contaminant: About $300,000

In a March 12 letter, the Army told the Environmental Working Group, an advocacy group, that the military would charge the group $290,400 to provide records of water tests at 154 installations for a family of compounds known as PFAS, which federal authorities say appear linked to certain cancers and other health and developmental problems. Reprint from the New York TimesWashington PostSan Francisco ChronicleSFGate and 303 other media outlets. 

The Colorado Springs Gazette: Pentagon lobbying for more lenient cleanup standard for toxic chemicals in El Paso County aquifer, report says

At that level, the military could avoid paying to clean up many contaminated sites across the nation, said David Andrews, senior scientist for the Washington D.C.-based Environmental Working Group, an advocacy group.

Kaiser Health News: KHN Morning Briefing – March 21, 2019

The Associated Press: Army Bill For Public Records On Contaminant: About $300,000. The U.S. Army has put a price tag on releasing the results of water tests for a dangerous contaminant at military installations: nearly $300,000. In a March 12 letter, the Army told the Environmental Working Group, an advocacy group, that the military would charge the group $290,400 to provide records of water tests at 154 installations for a family of compounds known as PFAS, which federal authorities say appear linked to certain cancers and other health and developmental problems. 

POLITICO – Morning Energy: It’ll Cost You
The U.S. Army is asking the Environmental Working Group for $290,400 to execute a public records request seeking data from 154 installations where water is contaminated by PFAS. In a letter dated March 12 and reported by the Associated Press, Army senior counsel Paul DeAgostino wrote that the green group's fee waiver request was denied.

Stars and Stripes: Army bill for public records on contaminants at military installations: About $300,000

In a March 12 letter, the Army told the Environmental Working Group, an advocacy group, that the military would charge the group $290,400 to provide records of water tests at 154 installations for a family of compounds known as PFAS, which federal authorities say appear linked to certain cancers and other health and developmental problems.

Society of Environmental Journalists: "Army Bill for Public Records On Contaminant: About $300,000

In a March 12 letter, the Army told the Environmental Working Group, an advocacy group, that the military would charge the group $290,400 to provide records of water tests at 154 installations for a family of compounds known as PFAS, which federal authorities say appear linked to certain cancers and other health and developmental problems. 

Polluted Farm Runoff

Mother Jones: The Hidden Catastrophe of the Midwest’s Floods

In a 2018 paper, Environmental Working Group researchers found that the USDA’s efforts to encourage Midwestern farmers to plant and maintain grass to avoid gully erosion have largely failed. 

BPA

Bustle: How Pollution Can Affect Your Hormones, According To Science

One of the most worrying substances when it comes to hormone disruption in pollution is bisphenol A (BPA), a chemical that is used to harden plastics. The Environmental Working Group told LiveScience that BPA is in a lot of products we use regularly, particularly plastics and canned food.

Cleaning Products

Accuweather: How are spring cleaning products hurting the environment, your health?

If you want to check out your own products and look for better alternatives the EWG Guide to Healthy Cleaning can give you ratings on cleaning products.

The Daily Meal: Why You Should Never Use Oven Cleaner and What to Use Instead

But according to Samara Geller, senior research and database analyst for the Environmental Working Group (EWG), oven cleaners are “especially hazardous.” It has to do with the ingredients used in oven cleaners, she told The Daily Meal. Reprinted by Yahoo!.

Reader’s Digest: 14 Ways Toxins Are Sneaking into Your House

You can also check the EWG’s lists of safe cosmetics and cleaning products.

Cosmetics

VOGUE India: Why are more skincare and makeup brands now focusing on clean beauty?

The Environmental Working Group in the US reported that women are now exposed to a daily average of 126 chemicals from cosmetics, food, cleaning supplies and pollution.

EWG VERIFIED™ and Herbal Essences
Brit+Co: Every Major Beauty Brand That’s Getting a Clean Makeover in 2019

Herbal Essences: The Environmental Working Group verified Herbal Essences’ recent clean shampoo collection, Bio:Renew, in January 2019, marking it the first-ever mass-market shampoo to hold the status. 

Farm Subsidies

The American Interest: Farming and Agriculture in the Age of Trump

The Environmental Working Group, using data they obtained through a FOIA request of USDA, reports that from 1995 to 2017, the largest 10 percent of subsidy recipients received 54 percent of all subsidies averaging more than $1 million over the period. 

Organic: The Original Clean Food Report

Civil Eats: The Dangerous Food Additive That’s Not on the Label

A report released earlier this month by the nonprofit Environmental Working Group (EWG), found that an estimated 2,000 synthetic substances are permitted in non-organic products, where they’re used to extend shelf-life and add flavor. On the other hand, fewer than 40 synthetic substances are approved for use in organic products.

PFAS in Cookware

Good Housekeeping: Is Nonstick Cookware Safe? Here's Everything You Need to Know, According to Experts

At 680° F, Teflon releases at least six toxic gases, including two carcinogens, according to a study by the Environmental Working Group, a nonprofit watchdog organization.

EWG's Guide to Sunscreens

Bustle: 50 Best-Sellers On Amazon That Are Under-$15 & Eco-Friendly

Made with 20 percent natural zinc oxide, this sunscreen has earned a prestigious number one rating from the Environmental Working Group's Skin Deep database for its non-toxic, hypoallergenic formula, and eco-friendly performance. Plus, because it's reef-safe, it's great for the ocean, too.

Chemical Watch: Feature: Miami Beach is fourth tourist spot to consider sunscreen ban

The US NGO Environmental Working Group (EWG), which has published an annual sunscreen guide for the past 12 years, says oxybenzone is a potential hazard to both the environment and human health.

Reader’s Digest: This Is the Only Sunscreen the FDA Wants You to Use

Garnering an “excellent” rating from the Environmental Working Group (EWG) for high UV protection and low toxicity, MDSolarSciences Mineral Crème Broad Spectrum SPF 50 Sunscreen is a hypoallergenic, non-comedogenic sunscreen that has an SPF of 50, thanks to its 17 percent zinc oxide and 2 percent titanium dioxide. 

Tap Water Database

ABC12: KSAT (San Antonio, Texas): Your Questions Answered: Understanding San Antonio's water quality

The nonprofit Environmental Working Group manages a database that collects local water reports and EPA reports. If you look up San Antonio water on EWG’s website, it says there are nine contaminants detected above health guidelines. 

Business Insider: 11 cities with the worst tap water in the US

As late as 2017, officials continued to express concern about the safety of the city's drinking water. That same year, the nonprofit Environmental Working Group found multiple contaminants in the city's water supply. 

PFAS in Drinking Water

Dayton Daily News: Progress slow in addressing chemicals in local water systems: Here’s what we found

“Absolutely, it just slows down the process,” said David Andrews, a senior scientist at advocacy nonprofit Environmental Working Group. “I think they’re likely on hold, they’re in limbo. Really from the public health perspective, the big tasks are identifying the sources of contamination, and there may be other places across the state where the extent of contamination isn’t really known.”

Detroit Public TV: Great Lakes States, U.S. EPA grapple with “Forever Chemicals”

The Environmental Working Group works nationally on PFAS and took a broader swipe at the EPA. “Over the past two decades it has become clear that the federal government is unable to incorporate modern science into its existing regulations and is unable to set any new drinking water regulations,” senior scientist David Andrews told Great Lakes Now.

Newsday: Opinion – Is it safe to drink American water?

The recent EPA report shows that PFAS were found in all 50 drinking water supplies that it tested — an alarming increase from a similar 2016 study that found PFAS in fewer than 3 percent of samples. Meanwhile, the Environmental Working Group issued a report stating that up to 110 million Americans could be drinking contaminated water. Reprinted by Inside Sources.

Water Filters

Business Insider: 11 smarter buys that can help curb your plastic bottle use — from a $32 reusable water bottle to a $210 filtration system

“Filtering water at home,” it turns out, “is the best and most cost-effective solution,” senior scientist at the Environmental Working Group (EWG) Dr. David Andrews tells Insider Picks. “In many cases, bottled water may not necessarily be better than tap water,” Andrews says, “and oftentimes companies do not provide much disclosure in terms of where that water came from and whether it is any better than municipal water.” 

 

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